We All Process Alcohol at the Same Rate, So Why Are BACs Different?

September 9, 2019

We all know that too many drinks can be a problem, but did you know that we all also process alcohol at a different rate? The increments may be small, but there are a variety of factors that can make a huge difference. The one thing all blood alcohol levels have in common is that the higher the number gets, the more intoxicated we are likely to feel. In addition, that magic number, BAC, will influence whether or not you receive a DUI if you are pulled over. For the average adult over the age of 21, our BAC needs to be below 0.08 percent. However, what you might not realize is that depending on your age or occupation that number can change.

Different BAC Limits for Different Drivers

BAC limits depend on not just your age, but the type of driver you are as well. For example, these drivers have different BAC level requirements:

  • Commercial Drivers – These drivers are held to different standards due to the type of vehicle they operate. These drivers often drive much larger and more dangerous vehicles that have the potential for causing a larger issue. Because of this, the BAC limit for these drivers is 0.04 percent instead of the standard 0.08 percent. Anything above 0.04 percent for these drivers could result in a DUI and loss of their commercial driver’s license.
  • Underage Drivers – South Carolina has a zero-tolerance policy when it comes to driving under the legal age. Therefore, the limit gets much lower for an underage driver to get in trouble. In fact, they can’t have any amount of alcohol in their system whatsoever or it could lead to a DUI. Because drunk driving shows a lack of judgment, not only could it have legal repercussions, but it could also lead to trouble with your school, parents, and college applications.

The key to blood alcohol limits is to remember that there is a variation to the limit based on your age and the type of job and/or driver’s license you have. While these factors won’t apply to some people, for others it should be a serious consideration.

How Our Bodies Process Alcohol

Although it takes some people more alcohol than others to feel “drunk,” it is important to understand that our bodies actually process alcohol at the same rate. Alcohol is processed in the liver where it breaks down the toxic substances found in alcohol. While the liver handles this process, it can still take a significant amount of time to do this. It will depend on how much you drink, but the liver can only process one ounce of alcohol per hour. This means that if you consume more than one ounce of alcohol per hour, your liver can’t keep up. Consequently, your blood alcohol levels will rise.

Contact an Experienced DUI Attorney Today

If you have been pulled over and have been charged with driving under the influence, you need an experienced attorney on your side. A Charleston SC DUI Lawyer at the David Aylor Law Offices have years of experience helping their clients handle DUI charges and we can help you too. Contact us today to schedule a consultation.

Free Case Evaluation

(843) 310-4900

All of our initial consultations are 100% FREE & Confidential. Fill out this form to request a FREE Consultation.

David Aylor Picture Overlay