Important Factors for Proving Negligence

July 20, 2022

In any personal injury case, the plaintiff has the burden of proof. This means that the plaintiff must provide evidence to support their allegations that the defendant was negligent and caused their injuries. The plaintiff cannot rely on speculation or conjecture; they must present concrete facts.

This can be difficult, as it often requires gathering evidence and preparing a case that will convince a judge or jury of the defendant’s negligence. To better understand what that means, we’ll look at the different elements of negligence and the important factors for proving negligence in personal injury cases.

The Different Types of Negligence

There are four types of negligence:

  • Comparative Negligence
  • Contributory Negligence
  • Gross Negligence
  • Vicarious Negligence/Liability

Comparative Negligence

Comparative negligence is when the plaintiff and defendant are both at fault for the accident. A judge or jury determines the degree of fault, and damages are awarded accordingly. For example, if the plaintiff is found to be 20% at fault, they may only receive 80% of the total damages. Some states, including South Carolina, use comparative negligence rules.

Contributory Negligence

Contributory negligence is when the plaintiff is partially at fault for the accident. This can be the case if the plaintiff was not paying attention or if they failed to take reasonable precautions. In states with contributory negligence rules, the plaintiff will not be able to recover any damages if they are found to be even slightly at fault for the accident. However, South Carolina does not use contributory negligence rules.

Gross Negligence

Gross negligence is when the defendant’s actions are so reckless that they show a complete disregard for the safety of others. This is a higher standard than simply being negligent, which is difficult to prove. An example of gross negligence would be if the defendant were driving while intoxicated.

Vicarious Negligence/Liability

Vicarious liability is when the defendant is not directly at fault for the accident, but their actions still led to the plaintiff’s injuries. This can be the case if the defendant is an employer and the accident was caused by one of their employees. Vicarious liability is often based on a theory of negligence called respondent superior, which holds that an employer is responsible for the actions of their employees.

What is the Burden of Proof in a Personal Injury Case?

The burden of proof is the legal standard that must be met to win a personal injury case. In some cases, the burden of proof may be higher, such as clear and convincing evidence or beyond a reasonable doubt.

The Four Elements of Proving Negligence

There are four important factors for proving negligence In personal injury cases: duty of care, breach of duty, causation, and damages. The plaintiff must prove all four elements to succeed in their personal injury case.

Duty of Care

The plaintiff must first show that the defendant owed them a duty of care. This means that the defendant was responsible for taking reasonable precautions to prevent foreseeable harm. For example, all drivers have a duty of care to obey traffic laws and drive safely.

Breach of Duty

The plaintiff must then show that the defendant breached their duty of care. This means that the defendant did not take reasonable precautions and their actions led to the plaintiff’s injuries. For example, if a driver runs a red light and hits another car, they have breached their duty of care.

Causation

The plaintiff must then show that the defendant’s breach of duty caused their injuries. This means that the plaintiff would not have been injured if the defendant had not breached their duty of care. For example, if the driver who ran the red light had not hit the other car, the passengers in that car would not have been injured.

Damages

Finally, the plaintiff must show that they suffered damages due to the defendant’s negligence. This can include physical injuries, emotional distress, property damage, and lost wages. The plaintiff must be able to prove that the defendant’s negligence caused their damages to recover compensation.

What Are Some Examples of Negligence?

Some examples of negligence in personal injury cases include:

  • A driver runs a red light and hits another car.
  • A store owner who fails to clean up a spill and a customer slips and falls.
  • A doctor prescribes the wrong medication to a patient.
  • A landlord who fails to fix a dangerous condition on their property.
  • An employer who fails to provide a safe work environment.

Possible Defenses of Negligence

There are a few defenses that can be used to defend against a negligence claim:

Assumption of Risk

The assumption of risk defense means that the plaintiff knew of the risks involved and proceeded. For example, if the plaintiff was aware that the defendant was driving recklessly but still got into the car, they may be assumed to have accepted the risks involved.

Contributory Negligence

As mentioned, contributory negligence is when the plaintiff is partially at fault for the accident. This defense can be used if the plaintiff did not take reasonable precautions or if their actions contributed to the accident. For example, the contributory negligence defense could be used if the plaintiff was not wearing a seatbelt and was injured in a car accident.

Comparative Negligence

The comparative negligence defense is similar to contributory negligence. Still, instead of being an all-or-nothing defense, it allows for the plaintiff’s damages to be reduced by their percentage of fault. For example, if the plaintiff were 20% at fault for the accident, their damages would be reduced by 20%.

How Can I Recover Compensation After an Accident?

You may be entitled to compensation if you have been injured in an accident. The best way to recover compensation is to speak with an experienced personal injury lawyer who can help you understand your legal rights and options.

Other Important Factors For Proving Negligence In Personal Injury Cases

There are a few other important factors to consider when proving negligence in personal injury cases:

  • The extent of the injury: To recover damages, the plaintiff must have suffered some form of injury. The extent of the injury will often determine the amount of compensation the plaintiff can recover.
  • Documentation: It is important to keep all documentation related to the accident, including medical records, police reports, witness statements, and other evidence.
  • Statute of limitations: The statute of limitations is the time limit for filing a personal injury lawsuit. In South Carolina, you have three years from the date of the injury to file a lawsuit.
  • Expert witnesses: In some cases, expert witnesses may need to testify about the accident. For example, an accident reconstruction specialist could be used to recreate the accident.

Proving negligence can be complex, but an experienced personal injury lawyer can help you navigate the legal system and recover the compensation you deserve.

Contact an Experienced Personal Injury Attorney in Charleston, SC

If you’ve suffered a personal injury that you believe was the fault of a negligent person, contact David Aylor Law Offices today for a free consultation.

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